El Galeon

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“Living is like tearing through a museum. Not until later do you really start absorbing what you saw, thinking about it, looking it up in a book, and remembering – because you can’t take it in all at once.”  Audrey Heburn – British actress and humanitarian

This past month we have partied like it was 1565, we have hobnobbed with the King and Queen of Spain (well not actually), and yet we have not been on board the El Galeon. Our Spanish culture trifecta and 450th St. Augustine birthday celebration is not complete. With only two days left in port we needed to remedy this pronto!

We walked from Hidden Harbor Marina down King Street to the water front and into the City Marina.

El Galeon is a 170 foot, 495 ton, wooden replica of a galleon ship that was part of Spanish fleet. The boat carries a crew of 22-40 depending on if she is traveling across the ocean or up and down the eastern coat of the US.

El Galeon resides on the outer dock.

El Galeon is a 170 foot, 495 ton, wooden replica of a galleon ship that was part of the historic Spanish fleet. The boat carries a crew of 22-40 depending on if she is traveling across the ocean or up and down the eastern coast of the US.

Alex on the foredeck of El Galeon

Alex on the forward deck of El Galeon

Alex and Dan, of S/V Cinderella. Dan and his wife have been serving as wood workers, cooks and tour guides with the crew all summer up and down the eastern seaboard.

Alex and Dan, of S/V Cinderella. 

Dan and his wife have served as wood workers, cooks and tour guides with the El Galeon crew all summer up and down the eastern seaboard.

El Galeon has over 6 miles of reporting and lines.

El Galeon has over 6 miles of rigging and lines.

El Galeon is nestled in to the St. Augustine Municipal Marina next to the Bridge of Lions (seen in the background)

El Galeon is nestled in to the St. Augustine Municipal Marina next to the Bridge of Lions (seen in the background)

The cannons are replicas of the ones that would have been aboard the ship in the 1600's.

The cannons are replicas of the ones that would have been aboard the ship in the 1600’s.

Each piece of wood, furniture and metal on this floating museum has been carefully replicated by skilled artisans from all over Spain, including these canons.

Each piece of wood, furniture and metal on this floating museum has been carefully replicated by skilled artisans from all over Spain, including the cannons.

The El Galeon is formally the "Galeon Andalvcia" as shown here on the metal barrel of the cannons

The El Galeon is formally named the “Galeon Andalvcia” as shown here on the metal barrel of the cannons.

A sideways glance of ratlines leading up to the crows nest.

A sideways glance of rat lines leading up to the crow’s nest.

The crows nest was used for keeping watch to spot land, other ships and potential hazards. Crows nest are no longer needed today as technology has introduced radar.

This is a view of the intricacies of the lines and the crows nest looking straight up. The crows nest was used for keeping watch. to spot land, other ships and hazards. Crows nest are no longer needed today as technology has introduced radar.

This is a view of the intricacies of the lines and the crow’s nest looking straight up.

Alex and Jaye from S/V Cinderella. Jaye was explaining how the sails are deployed and how they require "shaking out."

Alex and Jaye from S/V Cinderella. 

Jaye explained how the sails are deployed and how they need “shaking out.”

Lisa and Jaye from S/V Cinderella

Lisa and Jaye from S/V Cinderella

Traditionally the name of a ship is engraved or cast onto the surface of the ship's bell. It is also common to include the year of launch. On modern ships you may also find the name of the shipyard that built the vessel. The ships bell was used for safety in foggy conditions but most commonly used to signify watch times.

The bell for El Galeon.

Traditionally the name of a ship is engraved or cast onto the surface of the ship’s bell. It is also common to include the year of launch. On modern ships you may also find the name of the shipyard that built the vessel. The ships bell was used for safety in foggy conditions but most commonly used to signify watch times.

This pretty girl is a replica of her Spanish ancestors. However, she is equipped with modern conveniences such as hydraulics, depth sounder, chart plotter, fridge, freezers, showers, flushing toilets, washer and dryer for use by the crew, electrical hook-up and so on.

This pretty girl is a replica of her Spanish ancestors.

We are really happy that we took the time to enjoy this special floating gallery.  The boat is simply beautiful and the movie shown below decks about her 16 months of creation was very informative, as were all the individual exhibits.  All we can say is Viva Espana!

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